Preparing for your new kitten

You’ll want to have the basics ready for when kitty arrives.

  • litter box
  • litter
  • food bowl & water bowl
  • food
  • toys!
  • a snuggly place to sleep

Litter

We use Pelletized Equine Bedding specifically from Tractor Supply – the Tractor Supply Brand

                            

 

Here’s why:
1.Aesthetically it looks nicer in the box
2.It has little to no scent itself
3.It traps odor from urine
4.It is very easy to clean up – just dump the box and pour or scoop more in
5.It doesn’t stick to the box
6.It falls away from kitty’s coat easily – so kitty doesn’t lick it off their fur
7.The pellets degrade into a saw dust of sorts and it goes to the bottom of the pan while the pellets that are still pellets stay towards the top
8.It doesn’t form a sludge when wet, like the clumping litters do
9.Virtually no scooping items out, just dump the entire box after a few days.
10.It comes in a 40 lb bag, less trips to the store to pick up litter – drawback where ya gonna put the 40lb bag? We store our in the garage.
11.All of the above and it is less expensive than Tidy Cat (which is what we used before) and other brands.

Food

I’m a carnivore, ya know!? Click here to learn about feeding time!

Toys and Fun Stuff

You can find the carriers, toys, beds and collars we use in our Boutique

Bringing Kittens Home for the First Time

We get rave reviews from our mammas about how well and how quickly their new pals adjust to their new home, family and even other furry friends. We socialize our kittens with children and other pets and make a connection with them from the moment they can hear and see, however the info provided will help your kitty transition to your new home. Imagine being a young kitten in your new home, you endure new smells and sites. You may be a little afraid or lonely. (see getting two)

Taking care of kittens requires anticipating their needs. Give your new kitten guidance. Don’t let them wander around your home unattended.

Your new kitten may seem foreign to your other pets. Don’t introduce them to your kitten quite yet. Let the kitten get settled first. Put your other pets in another room away from your new kitten.

If you have children, remind them not to crowd around the kitten. Allow the kitten to have its space for a while. Often, children get excited about a new pet and want to play with it as much as possible. The kitten may become frightened, get annoyed with being petted too much, and scratch your child. Remind your children to play gently with the new delicate kitten.

Kitten’s Own Room

In the beginning it’s important that your new kitten have a space of its own. Having its own room will allow your new kitten time to gradually adjust to life in your home. The room could be an extra bathroom or spare bedroom. Just choose a quiet peaceful room with minimal traffic. If possible, put on classical music. It’s calming and kittens love it.

Make sure the essential supplies are in the room: litter box, food, water, and toys. In taking care of kittens make sure they do not to become bored. Keep in mind that a bored kitten can spell trouble. Kitten-proof the room by removing dangerous objects, hidey holes where they may become stuck, and electrical cords.

Giving your kitten its own room for a while also saves you from having to clean constantly around the house and is an important part of caring for kittens. Your new kitten is not use to finding its way around your home.

It may become confused and have difficulty locating its food or litter box. Having its essential supplies in one room will minimize your kitten’s confusion and your housecleaning.

How long should a kitten stay in its own room? It really depends on your kitten. A shy kitten may not leave the room the first few days. It may just peak its head out to check out surroundings. Other more outgoing kittens may want to look around you home right away. Let the kitten be the guide.

Lastly, remember not to leave your other pets unattended around your kitten, until they demonstrate that they will not hurt them. An older cat may start to groom your kitten. That’s a good sign. A dog may sniff your kitten’s rear end and sit peacefully with them.

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